How were Apollo 11 astronauts with no photography experience capable of taking pictures on the moon professionally with u201960s photographic equipment? Some people argue that the quality of those pictures shouldu2019ve been amateurish and blurry.

Moon photography cheat sheet

They had quite a lot of photography training prior to launch, much of it suited up, in the desert.

,They took mostly preplanned photographs Those photos that werenu2019t specific mission objectives, like those of experiments and panaramas of survey sites, were are least at preplanned locations, under lighting conditions known in advance.

,They were given guide cards (cheat sheets) with recommended camera settings for each mission phase.

,They were taughtu2014as all photographers in the film era were taught, to u201cbracketu201d their settings, that is, when in doubt of a setting like aperture, take one under, one over, and one in the middle, and one will come out just right.

,When the film was developed back on Earth, test frames at the start of each roll were developed first so that the chemistry for the rest of the roll could be adjusted for the condition of the film.

,When the transparencies were developed (back on Earth), proofs were used to test the exposure and color of each frame, and aid in picking out which frames should be reproduced for the media.

When they were copied, as with all commercial photophraphy of the time, the exposure, color, and contrast were adjusted in the enlarger by optical means.

,They took a lot of crappy pictures.

Pictures like this:,or this:,or this:,or this:,or this:,or my personal favorite, this:,The Apollo images you see in the magazines or in grainy hand-me-down jpg on conspiracy sites are not the story of Apollo.

The true story is more banal, more heroic, and more fascinatingu2014you just have to bother to look.

Moon with clouds photography settings

The pictures youre showing here are all slightly underexposed.

,Single Control To Set Exposure - I use aperture priority most of the time - its a quick way to set subject-based exposure with a single control.

I choose lens aperture for the depth of field I want, set ISO for a high-enough shutter speed to hand-hold, then apply exposure compensation.

,That compensation depends on my subject.

If theres a lot of white, or a bright background and shadowed subject, Ill choose overexposure by +1/2 to as much as +2 full stops to get proper subject exposure.

Ill do this for a bird in flight against bright sky or clouds.

,Raven mobbing Northern Harrier, Blufftop Coastal Park, Half Moon Bay, California - overexposed for proper exposure of Raven and detail in HarrierIf its a night scene, I may underexpose -2 to -3 stops to get it to appear like night, but retain some detail.

If its a sunset, I may underexpose just -1/3 to -2/3 stop to darken the sky and match what I see.

Slight underexposure may slightly increase color saturation.

,Fajada Butte, Chaco Canyon, NM, -2 stop underexposure so it looks like nightAlbuquerque sunset from Sandia foothills, -2/3 stop underexposure to match what I saw But I resist the temptation to do it all the time, since many subjects look peculiar when underexposed.

,** For more of the technical aspects - nRead your camera manual.

Then take a photo workshop given by someone specializing in the type of photography you want to do.

Theyll show you ways to use your camera for that specialty.

,For example, for petroglyph photography, youll want a polarizing filter to make the glyph pop out of the rock, and to underexpose to get the right rock color.

,For ruins and architecture, youll want to avoid close-ups with an ultra-wide angle lens.

Those wide angle close-ups will make everything close look unnaturally huge.

Mount a 24mm or 28mm lens for a more natural look on a full-frame camera.

,Then stick with one camera.

Pick one that gives you a system of good lenses.

Just remember you can take great photographs with a $500 refurbished Canon EOS T5i and 18-55mm kit lens.

You dont need a big-bucks camera to begin.

That EOS T5i will mount Canon EF lenses from 15mm to 600mm when youre ready.

,Nikon has similar gear with their F-mount.

You can use Nikon lenses dating back to 1959 with that mount.

,** For the creative aspects - nAt that photo workshop, theyll also show you the way they arrange their composition - their shot design.

And theyll show you the best times and locations for the best light.

They may teach you to find great light, then find something to put in it.

They may also teach you to go where your subject is (or is likely to be), and usually before 9 am and after 4 pm for warm light thats less contrasty.

,You may hear about the rule of thirds, avoiding bullseye centering of your horizontal subject, and including something in bird flight shots besides plain, boring blue sky.

,Also understand that a photograph tells a story.

You focus that story on one subject.

Avoid cluttering that story with kitchen-sink details - be selective in whats in your pictures.

,But the best way to improve your photography is to take pictures.

,Go out and photograph your passion.

It will take at least a year - a few thousand hours - to master your craft.

From the pictures you show, your inner eye is very good.

It takes awhile for your ability to catch up, to translate what you see into a pleasing photograph.

,=> Remember to have fun on the way.

,TIP - nIt was published awhile ago, but the Ansel Adams Photography Series book The Camera will teach you about how camera controls affect depth of field and subject movement, among other things.

In the same series, The Negative discusses contrast range and the Zone System.

This is a useful tool to predict what will appear properly-exposed in your photograph.

Adams emphasizes pre-visualization - learning to visualize a picture before you capture it.

This greatly improves your photographs.

Moon photography settings Nikon

To photograph just the moon by itself, without any objects in the foreground, you will need a long telephoto lens like explained above to magnify the moon and try to fill as much of the frame as possible.

Even with a good telephoto lens setup though, you will most likely be cropping the final image, simply because only a telescope would be able to provide enough magnification to fill the entire frame.

With your telephoto lens mounted in your camera, secure it on a tripod and point at the moon.

Make sure that your tripod is good and stable enough to accommodate and hold your lens and your camera.

When it comes to shutter speed, aperture and ISO, here is what I recommend for general use:,Camera Mode: Set your camera mode to full Manual Mode.

,ISO: Set your ISO to 100 if you have a Canon DSLR and to 200 if you have a Nikon DSLR (basically, whatever base ISO you have in your camera).

For most other brands, the base ISO is also 100.

If you have a point and shoot camera, see if you can find a menu setting to set your ISO to 100.

Make sure u201cAuto ISOu201d is turned Off.

,Aperture: Set your aperture to f/11.

,Shutter Speed: Set your shutter speed to 1/125 on cameras with base ISO 100, and to 1/250 on Nikon DSLRs with base ISO 200.

,Lens Focus: Set your lens to manual focus (either through a switch on the lens or on the camera) and set your focus to infinity.

Be careful while setting the focus to infinity, as some lenses allow focusing beyond infinity.

On more advanced DSLRs such as Nikon D300, there is a handy feature called u201clive-view with contrast detectu201d, which can accurately acquire focus on distant objects.

I have used it many times for my moon photography and it works great! If you do not have such a feature in your camera, then try setting your lens to the center of the infinity sign, then take a picture and see if it came out sharp by zooming in the rear LCD of the camera.

,For more you may check this How to Photograph the Moon out u2026

Moon photography settings Canon

The pictures youre showing here are all slightly underexposed.

,Single Control To Set Exposure - I use aperture priority most of the time - its a quick way to set subject-based exposure with a single control.

I choose lens aperture for the depth of field I want, set ISO for a high-enough shutter speed to hand-hold, then apply exposure compensation.

,That compensation depends on my subject.

If theres a lot of white, or a bright background and shadowed subject, Ill choose overexposure by +1/2 to as much as +2 full stops to get proper subject exposure.

Ill do this for a bird in flight against bright sky or clouds.

,Raven mobbing Northern Harrier, Blufftop Coastal Park, Half Moon Bay, California - overexposed for proper exposure of Raven and detail in HarrierIf its a night scene, I may underexpose -2 to -3 stops to get it to appear like night, but retain some detail.

If its a sunset, I may underexpose just -1/3 to -2/3 stop to darken the sky and match what I see.

Slight underexposure may slightly increase color saturation.

,Fajada Butte, Chaco Canyon, NM, -2 stop underexposure so it looks like nightAlbuquerque sunset from Sandia foothills, -2/3 stop underexposure to match what I saw But I resist the temptation to do it all the time, since many subjects look peculiar when underexposed.

,** For more of the technical aspects - nRead your camera manual.

Then take a photo workshop given by someone specializing in the type of photography you want to do.

Theyll show you ways to use your camera for that specialty.

,For example, for petroglyph photography, youll want a polarizing filter to make the glyph pop out of the rock, and to underexpose to get the right rock color.

,For ruins and architecture, youll want to avoid close-ups with an ultra-wide angle lens.

Those wide angle close-ups will make everything close look unnaturally huge.

Mount a 24mm or 28mm lens for a more natural look on a full-frame camera.

,Then stick with one camera.

Pick one that gives you a system of good lenses.

Just remember you can take great photographs with a $500 refurbished Canon EOS T5i and 18-55mm kit lens.

You dont need a big-bucks camera to begin.

That EOS T5i will mount Canon EF lenses from 15mm to 600mm when youre ready.

,Nikon has similar gear with their F-mount.

You can use Nikon lenses dating back to 1959 with that mount.

,** For the creative aspects - nAt that photo workshop, theyll also show you the way they arrange their composition - their shot design.

And theyll show you the best times and locations for the best light.

They may teach you to find great light, then find something to put in it.

They may also teach you to go where your subject is (or is likely to be), and usually before 9 am and after 4 pm for warm light thats less contrasty.

,You may hear about the rule of thirds, avoiding bullseye centering of your horizontal subject, and including something in bird flight shots besides plain, boring blue sky.

,Also understand that a photograph tells a story.

You focus that story on one subject.

Avoid cluttering that story with kitchen-sink details - be selective in whats in your pictures.

,But the best way to improve your photography is to take pictures.

,Go out and photograph your passion.

It will take at least a year - a few thousand hours - to master your craft.

From the pictures you show, your inner eye is very good.

It takes awhile for your ability to catch up, to translate what you see into a pleasing photograph.

,=> Remember to have fun on the way.

,TIP - nIt was published awhile ago, but the Ansel Adams Photography Series book The Camera will teach you about how camera controls affect depth of field and subject movement, among other things.

In the same series, The Negative discusses contrast range and the Zone System.

This is a useful tool to predict what will appear properly-exposed in your photograph.

Adams emphasizes pre-visualization - learning to visualize a picture before you capture it.

This greatly improves your photographs.

How to take pictures of the moon with smartphone

If you mean detailed photo, no.

However, some of my cellphone photos of the moon have turned out okay.

,My current phone (Samsung) takes crappy photos.

,The moon looks like this:,My Sony took better moon photos:,The camera with telephoto lens (and even betteru2013our telescope) gave us the most detailed moon photos.

Like this:

How to photograph the moon with iPhone

Unless you have the ability to manually override your cameras exposure setting, photographing the moon is very difficult.

The problem is you typically have a scene that has a small bright object surrounded by the blackness of the sky, and your cameras metering averages this out to give you a moon image that is very over-exposed, with no details.

,Further, unless you are using a lens in the 200-500mmm range, the scale of the moon on your film or sensor is going to be very small.

,But if you can get a telephoto lens and a tripod, then you can apply the moony 11 rule which says if you are shooting at f/11 then the correct exposure will be 1/ISO, so if you are at ISO 100, correct exposure would be 1/100th of a second (assuming a full moon).

You can take that guidance and extrapolate to other foc.

.

.

Full moon landscape photography

Immediate days after a full moon, sunrises are quite awesome! Even if you do have to stop on a bridge, roll down the window and shoot!